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New JFK Tapes Released by Kennedy Library (free download)

English: Israeli foreign minister Golda Meir v...

Kennedy and Golda

http://www.thedailybeast.com/articles/2012/01/24/jfk-tapes-related-7-revealing-moments.html

President Kennedy recorded more than 260 hours of his life in the White House, unbeknownst to even his top aides. Now the Kennedy library has released  (free download) the final 45 hours of the archives, providing a rare window into Kennedy’s life in the three months before his assassination in Dallas on Nov. 22, 1963. The Daily Beast rounds up the most interesting excerpts.

 

1. Fretting Over Income Inequality

In a conversation with aides that could come straight out of a modern White House, Kennedy worries about income inequality and the difficulty of appealing to young voters. “What is it we have to sell them?” Kennedy asks an aide in November 1963. “We hope we have to sell them prosperity, but for the average guy the prosperity is nil. He’s not unprosperous but he’s not very prosperous; he’s not going to make out well off. And the people who really are well off hate our guts.”

Oh Please: “Kennedy’s presidency…mediocrity whose death left his final grade as “incomplete.”

English: Posthumous official presidential port...

JFK official portrait that hangs in the WH chosen by Jackie O

You know it’s articles like this one that would have Jack turning over in his grave.  That is if he was in his grave.  Apparently he is not dead according to this jerk:  I already know.

http://www.nytimes.com/2011/11/27/opinion/sunday/Douthat-The-Enduring-Cult-of-Kennedy.html?_r=2

THE cult of John F. Kennedy has the resilience of a horror-movie villain. No matter how many times the myths of Camelot are seemingly interred by history, they always come shambling back to life — in another television special, another Vanity Fair cover story, another hardcover hagiography.

By: Ross Douthat

Readers’ Comments

Readers shared their thoughts on this article.

It’s fitting, then, that the latest exhumation comes courtesy of Stephen King himself. King serves a dual role in our popular culture: He’s at once the master of horror and the bard of the baby boom, writing his way through the twilit borderlands where the experiences of the post-World War II generation are stalked by nightmares and shadowed by metaphysical dread.

In this landscape, the death of J.F.K. looms up like the Overlook Hotel. The gauzy fantasy of the Kennedy White House endures precisely because the reality of the assassination still feels like a primal catastrophe — an irruption of inexplicable evil as horrifying as any supernatural bogeyman.

At its best, King’s new Kennedy assassination novel, “11/22/63” — which sends its protagonist back in time to change that November day’s events — offers an implicit critique of this generational obsession. (I am not giving much away when I reveal that the time-traveling hero does not succeed in freeing ’60s America from the cruel snares of history.)

11/22/63 new novel by Stephan King at Amazon

If you squint real hard you just might think that Stephan King has stumbled into the rebirth zone! That’s my take on his new novel. In fact I am going to post a link to it. It might be worth a read and I don’t read his novels.

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